NOTICE BOARD

RESEARCH

Rangahau

Rauawaawa has been privileged to do research with and for kaumātua, as guided and informed by kaumātua themselves, over the last decade. Our research involvement aligns with Rauawaawa’s vision of enhancing kaumātua quality of life and wellbeing as well as our five pou outlined in our Trust Deed being: health and well-being, housing, welfare, recreation, and education. Current and past research projects have been collaborative primarily with the University of Waikato and Te Rūnanga o Kirikiriroa. They include:

CURRENT

He Kāinga Pai Rawa: Social Enterprise Toolkit.
(A research project that aims to develop a Social Enterprise Toolkit that captures the learnings from the Kuki Reka Kani – Cookie Cutter journey in order to support other groups of Kaumātua wishing to enter into that area):
(Support role) 2023-2024, led by the University of Waikato in collaboration with the University of Waikato (Dr Mary Simpson and Dr Sophie Nock) and Te Rūnanga o Kirikiriroa (Mrs Yvonne Wilson). A Building Better, Homes, Towns and Cities: National Science Challenge funded Project.
‘He Kāinga Pai Rawa 2: Kaumātua and intergenerational housing needs.’
(A research project that promotes the building of Kaumātua Housing using the toolkit with two others wishing to build Kaumātua Housing in Aotearoa, with intergenerational housing also a focus):
(Support role) 2020-2024 led by the University of Waikato (Professor John Oetzel, Dr Sophie Nock and Dr Mary Simpson) and in collaboration with Te Rūnanga o Kirikiriroa (Mrs Yvonne Wilson). A Building Better, Homes, Towns and Cities: National Science Challenge funded Project.
‘Kaumātua Mana Motuhake Pōī.’
(Co-Lead role: 2019-2023, led by the University of Waikato (Professor Brendan Hokowhitu and Professor John Oetzel). In collaboration with 13 other organisations across Aotearoa. An Ageing Well: National Science Challenge funded Project.

PAST

Health Equity And Wellbeing Among Older People’s Caregivers During COVID-19
(Support role) 2021- 2022, in collaboration with and led by the University of Auckland (Professor Vanessa Burholt). A Health Research Council funded Project.
He Kāinga Pai Rawa Atu Mō Ngā Kaumātua: He keteparaha tēnei mō te whare kaumātua – A really good home for our kaumātua: A toolkit for kaumātua housing.
Development of the Kaumātua Housing Toolkit) (Lead role) 2018-2019 in collaboration with the University of Waikato (Dr Mary Simpson and Dr Sophie Nock) and Te Rūnanga o Kirikiriroa (Mrs Yvonne Wilson). A Building Better, Homes, Towns and Cities: National Science Challenge funded Project.
He Kāinga Pai Rawa: A really good home. (Development of three think pieces)
(Lead role) 2017-2018 in collaboration with the University of Waikato (Dr Mary Simpson and Dr Sophie Nock) and Nga Rau Tatangi / Waikato Housing Hub (Mrs Yvonne Wilson). A Building Better, Homes, Towns and Cities: National Science Challenge funded Project.
‘Kaumātua mana motuhake: Kaumātua managing life transitions through tuakana-teina/peer education’.
(Co-Lead role) 2017-2019 and led by the University of Waikato (Professor Brendan Hokowhitu and Professor John Oetzel). An Ageing Well: National Science Challenge funded Project.
Māori Health Literacy and Communication in Palliative Care: Kaumātua-led models
(Lead role) 2011-2013 and supported by the University of Waikato, Te Rūnanga o Kirikiriroa, Waikato DHB and the University of Auckland – Waikato Clinical School).
Rauawaawa has in the past played a less formal role in supporting many other research projects that align with one or more of our five pou. Our current position on supporting research is to ensure researchers at a minimum:
  1. Make their approach early in the development of their research and not last minute.
  2. Work on developing the relationship before the details of the project.
  3. Ensure the way in which research is carried out be with Kaumātua and not done too them.
  4. Appropriately value the time and matauranga of Kaumātua (at this moment no less than $100 vouchers each time they are approached or engaged), kaimahi hauora and community organisations.
  5. Be transparent and be ready for discussion on IP and data sovereignty.
  6. Be prepared for additional costs and time to address cultural requirements (if not already factored in).
  7. Provide clear documentation early, be properly engaged in the relationship and communicate consistently.
  8. Be inclusive in analysis to ensure appropriate perspectives are being drawn on for interpretation of data.
  9. Be inclusive in the authorship of publications and presentations to acknowledge contribution to knowledge.
  10. Where there is uncertainty, seek the advice of Kaumātua or those that have worked with Kaumātua for at least more than five years.
All of these we hold important factors to show that as a researcher they are a respectful and relatively safe pair of hands to engage with our community (it doesn’t mean there will be no mistakes made, but there will be less). Finally, it demonstrates an effort to uphold the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi in their professional research practice.